FCHI Interdisciplinary Research Seminars (CHIIRS)

chiirsThe FCHI Interdisciplinary Research Seminars (CHIIRS), funded by an NEH Challenge Grant, are clusters of Emory University faculty and graduate students who meet monthly to discuss collaborative humanistic studies on interdisciplinary topics such as time periods or geographical areas.

CHIIRS application 

WHAT ARE CHIIRS?

Along with its role as a residential research center for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities, the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry develops and coordinates humanities programming across the Emory campus. A major component of this effort is the sponsorship of FCHI Interdisciplinary Research Seminars (CHIIRS), clusters of faculty and graduate students engaged in collaborative humanistic studies.

These seminars range from traditional areas of study, such as time periods or geographical areas, to the emerging cross-disciplinary and cross-theoretical structures. CHIIRS typically meet once a month during the academic semester in the Seminar Room of the Fox Center. Programming will be a combination of individual presentations on research in progress, group discussions of specific research topics in the given areas, occasional outside speakers, and whatever other academic formats each seminar may find useful in furthering its particular intellectual mission. 

If you would like to participate in one of the seminars, please contact the moderator. If you would like to propose a seminar for academic year 2017-2018, please contact the Fox Center at phone 404-727-6424 or by email at foxcenter@emory.edu.

2016-2017 Seminars

Yours  Wonder  Euphoria  HotMilk  LittleLife  Green
Contemporary Women Novelists Reading Group
Facilitator: Dr. Sandra J. Still, English and Women's Studies Librarian, Robert W. Woodruff Library

This seminar brings together faculty and graduate students from a range of disciplines interested in reading and discussing novels by contemporary women writers.

McClintock1    McClintock2
Seminar for Cross-Cultural and Comparative Philosophy and Theology
Facilitator: Professor Sara McClintock, Department of Religion

In his recent manifesto, “Why Philosophy Must Go Global,” philosopher Jonardon Ganeri coined the term “the age of re:emergence” to describe the newly developing situation for academic philosophy in our times. In this age, Ganeri argues, philosophy is returning to a long lost polycentric modality in which diverse philosophies from around the world, each grounded in its own local practices, may contribute to the production of new forms of authentic philosophical communication. This seminar is for all who are interested in thinking hard thoughts about the human condition alongside others with a different philosophical formation and who may therefore ask unexpected questions or help deliver new insights.  

Tam Institute for Jewish Studies
Jews in a World of ‘Difference’: From Antiquity through Modern Times

In conjunction with a recent gift of the Waxman family to support teaching, research and programming on Antisemitism, the Holocaust, and relations between Jews and other communities, the seminar will critically interrogate the category of antisemitism by thinking about how Jews have been perceived as different (not always necessarily in a negative way) and by contextualizing these perceptions within larger notions of “difference” in various societies and time periods.

2015-2016 Seminars

Goldfinch  Watchman  Both  Furies  Light  Faithful   
Contemporary Women Novelists Reading Group
Facilitator: Dr. Sandra J. Still, English and Women's Studies Librarian, Robert W. Woodruff Library

This seminar brings together faculty and graduate students from a range of disciplines interested in reading and discussing novels by contemporary women writers.

         Roy3
Tactical Materialisms: Feminism, Science, and BioArt
Moderated by Professor Deboleena Roy, Women’s Studies and Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology

This CHIIRS seminar series will explore current conversations in feminist science and technology studies (STS) that bring together questions of bodies, biologies and molecular politics.  In particular, it will consider new ways for feminist STS scholars to engage with questions of matter and materiality by paying close attention to recent works in critical BioArt activism.  

Bounds
Culture Behind Bars: Humanities and Incarceration
Moderated by Professor Elizabeth Bounds, Candler School of Theology/Graduate Division of Religion

In the United States, about 1 in every 35 adults in the United States, or 2.9% of adult residents, are on probation or parole or incarcerated in prison or jail, the highest incarceration rate in the world.  Prisoners and detainees in many local, state and federal facilities, confront conditions that are abusive, degrading and dangerous.  Under such conditions, engagement with the humanities, through reading, writing, artmaking, and/or performance, can be a moment of humanization where persons are affirmed as human in a profoundly inhuman environment.  This seminar focuses upon the relationship of humanities and confinement as multidimensional and transformative.  



 AMS1   AMS2
  
                              

 

2014-2015 Seminars

 Still#1  Upstairs  Still#6  Blazing  Bees  Midnight    
Contemporary Women Novelists Reading Group
Facilitator: Dr. Sandra J. Still, English and Women's Studies Librarian, Robert W. Woodruff Library

This seminar brings together faculty and graduate students from a range of disciplines interested in reading and discussing novels by contemporary women writers.
 

  Digital1  Digital  Digital2    
Digital Humanities Roundtables
Moderator: Keith Anthony, Associate Director, The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry

As we seek to find ways to better support all faculty, we are very interested in hearing from members of the research faculty about their experiences with digital humanities, from those with who are very familiar with various new media to those who are not. 

Staging
Staging our Stories
Moderator: Professor Debra Vidali, Anthropology

This seminar explores the intersection of public life, ethics, arts, and social science through the form of verbatim documentary theater.  Through both readings and screenings, we will consider the design, content, and impact of bold contemporary performance pieces – such as The Laramie ProjectThe Vagina MonologuesLet Me Down Easy, and Working -- that are based on real events and that use the form of interviews and personal narratives to generate material for the stage.